Mar 7, 2006

Article to Check Out:

Saving Celtic Christianity by Loren Wilkinson

I'd like to know what others think of this article. The author makes a strong case for why Christians should be interested in the growing popularity of Celtic spirituality and also why much of it is myth and wishful thinking. What do you think?

I'll chime in later.

8 comments:

  1. Cindy,

    Congratulations on this Celtic Blog. I guessed right: it's green. Hope you get loads of visitors.

    Terry
    The Writing Life

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey I like this Celtic Blog! It'd be cool if you had soft Celtic music in the background. Hope you get lots of visitors too.
    ~ Brenda

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi! I also like this blog/subject. Looking forward to more!

    Link, however, to article doesn't work.

    More soon!

    Debbie

    ReplyDelete
  4. Turns out there was a problem with the site the article is on. As of now it's working. Hopefully you all will read it and comment.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Cindy: Welcome to the world of blogging! Looking forward to following your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for commenting on Emerging Kids! And, writer to writer, congratuations on your book!

    I read this article when I first started exploring Celtic Christianity and I think he takes a circumspect and "fair" look, mining the gold of it and sifting cautiously through the dross.

    As literate as we are, as much as we're taught to question, we take a lot of what we hear without ever "searching the scriptures to see if these things be so." Already, our faith and ideas are generally more influenced by Greek and Roman culture than the Hebrews or the Celts and most of us have no idea that they are so different and that the different ways of thinking will lead us to different places and affect/effect how we know God and how we reflect Him.

    I wonder if, just like there are words for things in one culture that don't exist in another, if the ways in which different cultures embrace Father, Son, and Holy Spirit and His Word actually help us see the scriptures and "know" God in ways we wouldn't without their insights. The ways that God reveals Himself through His Word shape and form us and hopefully equip us to better reflect who He is. I expect that when, someday, we experience the worship described in Revelation, and finally see Him face to face, most of us will have our doctrinal theologies blown to pieces.

    His teaching matters, His Words matter, and He sets perimeters don't get me wrong, but the world of our own thinking is so small and He is so not small.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Margie said: "Already, our faith and ideas are generally more influenced by Greek and Roman culture than the Hebrews or the Celts and most of us have no idea that they are so different and that the different ways of thinking will lead us to different places and affect/effect how we know God and how we reflect Him."

    I think that's so true. Many people don't know what Celtic Spirituality was in ancient times. In fact, many shy away, equating Celtic with pagan when there is so much to learn from evangelistic monks, for example.

    Any other thoughts??

    And thanks, Margie for your congratualtions.
    Cindy

    ReplyDelete
  8. Cindy, I just picked up a book as old as the article you linked to, and I highly recommend it. It is The Celtic Way of Evangelism, by George G. Hunter, III. (I've only read 50 pages so far, but as it was recommended to me by author Calvin Miller, I have no problem passing on that recommendation.)

    Hunter offers some good cultural and spiritual background to how Christianity came to and flourished in Ireland. I'm eager to learn more from him...and from what may be offered here at your blog.

    ReplyDelete